The 6th Friend (2016)

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The concept of feminism as it pertains to horror is a conversation unto itself but suffice it to say some subgenres lend themselves to it more naturally than others. For instance rape/revenge films (when done properly) can convey a powerful message about reclaiming power and seeking justice against the assailants. The slasher subgenre is a little more ambiguous on this subject because yes, the typical Final Girl getting the best of the villain can be seen as empowering but much of the runtime of your standard slasher features a male character gruesomely murdering a mostly female cast. All this to say that when a slasher comes out that is unequivocally feminist it is an occasion to take notice and that’s exactly what we get in The 6th Friend.

The film opens with a small group of friends enjoying a typical night of partying that soon turns into a traumatic event that they endure together. Some time later Melissa (Chantelle Albers) tries to stitch the group back together with a retreat to a remote cabin in the woods. Joey (Jamie Bernadette, who also co-wrote) has been the most affected by the experience and comes along very reluctantly, not wanting anything that will remind her of that traumatic night. But of course the past has a way of finding you and soon the women are in a fight for their lives against the very thing they were trying to forget.

In an age when every other slasher seems to take place in the woods, it’s nice to see a film6th-friend-knife-e1547402796837.jpeg that makes an effort to establish the characters as real people and not just derivative stereotypes, thereby elevating the story above its basic setting. The feminist theme and social commentary also helps to set it apart and factors heavily into some major plot points (which I won’t spoil here) as well as dialogue that feels especially prescient today. It’s also nice that the characters (mostly) make logical decisions in service of their own survival although it does make it more noticeable the few times that they don’t. The twist nicely ties into the story thematically but it does make some of the earlier scenes feel like a bit of a reach as a result.

Originally released to home media in 2016, the film is finally getting a long overdue theatrical release as of January 11th 2019. It’s great to see this film getting the big screen treatment because in an industry crammed full of remakes and cheap cash-ins, a fresh perspective is always a welcome change. Definitely a trip into the woods that’s well worth taking.

3-5-stars-red

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